What is Criminology

Criminology is the study of crime and criminal justice. It considers a broad range of topics related to offending and victimisation, including their causes, social impact and prevention.

Specifics

  • Course specific entry requirements

    Grade 4 in English

  • Assessment methods

    50% exams, 50% controlled assessment

  • Course duration

    2 years

  • Course type

    Level 3 Applied Diploma

  • Exam Board

    WJEC

How you will study:

All of the Criminology teachers are experienced, well qualified and have a track record of excellence. A wide variety of teaching methods are used to ensure all our students learn effectively. Students will be rigorously assessed throughout the course, with debate and discussion in class encouraged. Students are helped to develop independent learning and revision strategies, and additional support out of class is encouraged.

Course content summary:

  • Unit 1 – Changing awareness of crime
  • Unit 2 – Criminological theories
  • Unit 3 – Crime scene to courtroom
  • Unit 4 – Crime and punishment

Course Content

  • Unit 1 – Changing awareness of crime

    Students will consider questions such as: What different types of crime take place in our society? What kinds of crime are simply not reported to the police and the media? How do we explain people’s reluctance to come forward about crimes of which they have been the victim? Why do people turn a ‘blind eye’ to ‘mild’ crimes such as counterfeiting designer goods? To what extent are we misled by our tastes in TV programmes and newspapers about crime? Who decides what behaviours should be against the law?

  • Unit 2 – Criminological theories

    Students will consider questions such as: What is the difference between criminal behaviour and deviance? How do we explain why people commit crime? What makes someone a serial killer, or abusive to their own families? Criminologists have produced theoretical explanations of why people commit crime, but which is the most useful? How can these theories be applied to real life crimes?

  • Unit 3 – Crime scene to courtroom

    Students will consider questions such as: What are the roles of personnel involved when a crime is detected? What investigative techniques are available to investigators to help to identify the culprit? Do techniques differ depending on the type of crime being investigated? What happens to a suspect once charged by the police and the Crown Prosecution Service? What safeguards are in place to ensure a suspect has a fair trial? What is the role of the jury in a criminal trial? Why do miscarriages of justice sometimes occur?

  • Unit 4 – Crime and punishment

    Students will consider questions such as: Why do most of us tend to obey the law even when to do so is against our own interests? What social institutions have we developed to ensure that people do obey laws? What happens to those who violate our legal system? Why do we punish people? How do we punish people? What organisations do we have in our society to control criminality? How effective are these organisations in dealing with criminality?

Extra curricular opportunities

Criminology students will be given the opportunity to take part in the National Bar Mock Trial competition, and to take part in trips to visit the courts in Manchester, London, and even New York.

In conjunction with our Careers team, there are opportunities offered to gain work experience and to explore Criminology at university.

What can I do after Xaverian?

The course is a useful stepping stone to a wide range of popular university courses such as Law, Sociology, Psychology, Criminology and combined courses such as Law with Criminology, Criminology with Psychology and Criminology with Sociology. The course will also provide students with the understanding and skills relevant to employment within the legal profession and the criminal justice system, for example the National Probation Service, the Courts and Tribunals Service and the National Offender Management Service.

Course Content

  • Unit 1 – Changing awareness of crime

    Students will consider questions such as: What different types of crime take place in our society? What kinds of crime are simply not reported to the police and the media? How do we explain people’s reluctance to come forward about crimes of which they have been the victim? Why do people turn a ‘blind eye’ to ‘mild’ crimes such as counterfeiting designer goods? To what extent are we misled by our tastes in TV programmes and newspapers about crime? Who decides what behaviours should be against the law?

  • Unit 2 – Criminological theories

    Students will consider questions such as: What is the difference between criminal behaviour and deviance? How do we explain why people commit crime? What makes someone a serial killer, or abusive to their own families? Criminologists have produced theoretical explanations of why people commit crime, but which is the most useful? How can these theories be applied to real life crimes?

  • Unit 3 – Crime scene to courtroom

    Students will consider questions such as: What are the roles of personnel involved when a crime is detected? What investigative techniques are available to investigators to help to identify the culprit? Do techniques differ depending on the type of crime being investigated? What happens to a suspect once charged by the police and the Crown Prosecution Service? What safeguards are in place to ensure a suspect has a fair trial? What is the role of the jury in a criminal trial? Why do miscarriages of justice sometimes occur?

  • Unit 4 – Crime and punishment

    Students will consider questions such as: Why do most of us tend to obey the law even when to do so is against our own interests? What social institutions have we developed to ensure that people do obey laws? What happens to those who violate our legal system? Why do we punish people? How do we punish people? What organisations do we have in our society to control criminality? How effective are these organisations in dealing with criminality?

Extra curricular opportunities

Criminology students will be given the opportunity to take part in the National Bar Mock Trial competition, and to take part in trips to visit the courts in Manchester, London, and even New York.

In conjunction with our Careers team, there are opportunities offered to gain work experience and to explore Criminology at university.

What can I do after Xaverian?

The course is a useful stepping stone to a wide range of popular university courses such as Law, Sociology, Psychology, Criminology and combined courses such as Law with Criminology, Criminology with Psychology and Criminology with Sociology. The course will also provide students with the understanding and skills relevant to employment within the legal profession and the criminal justice system, for example the National Probation Service, the Courts and Tribunals Service and the National Offender Management Service.